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Vaccination Schedule for Children

Created: 11/02/2011
Last Updated: 05/20/2015

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This schedule is a suggested vaccination schedule for children. Talk with your health care professional for guidance.

Vaccine When Why
Children age 0-6 years
Hepatitis B (HepB) 1st dose at birth
2nd dose at 1-2 months
3rd dose at 6-18 months
4th dose (given no earlier than 24 weeks) may be permissible if a combination vaccine containing HepB is administered after the birth dose
Protects against the Hepatitis B virus, a serious disease that affects the liver.
Rotavirus 1st dose given at 2 months
2nd dose given at 4 months
3rd dose given at 6 months
Protects against rotavirus, the most common cause of diarrhea in children.
Diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis (DTap) 1st dose given at 2 months
2nd dose given at 4 months
3rd dose given at 6 months
4th dose given at 15-18 months
5th dose given at 4-6 years
Protects against diphtheria, a serious bacterial infection that usually affects the mucous membranes of the nose and throat; tetanus, a disease that affects the body’s muscles and nerves; and pertussis (whooping cough), a highly contagious bacterial infection that causes uncontrollable, violent coughing.
Haemophilus influenzae type b 1st dose given at 2 months
2nd dose given at 4 months
3rd dose given at 6 months
4th dose given at 12-15 months
Protects against haemophilus influenzae type b, a bacteria responsible for severe pneumonia, meningitis and other invasive diseases.
Pneumococcal vaccine (PCV) or pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine (PPSV)* 1st dose of PCV given at 2 months
2nd dose of PCV given at 4 months
3rd dose of PCV given at 6 months
4th dose of PCV given between 12 and 15 months
PPSV dose given between 24 months and 6 years*
Protects against pneumococcal bacteria, which can cause pneumonia, bacteremia and meningitis.
Inactivated poliovirus 1st dose given at 2 months
2nd dose given at 4 months
3rd dose given between 6 and 18 months
4th dose given between 4 and 6 years
Protects against the virus that causes polio, a highly infectious disease that invades the nervous system and can quickly lead to paralysis.
Influenza vaccine (seasonal) Yearly dose recommended starting at 6 months Helps protect against seasonal flu and 2009 H1N1 viruses.
Measles, mumps and rubella (MMR) 1st dose given at 12-15 months
2nd dose given at 4-6 years
Protects against measles, a highly contagious virus that causes respiratory symptoms and a rash; mumps, a virus that causes swollen glands; and rubella (German measles), a virus that primarily affects the skin and lymph nodes.
Varicella (chicken pox) 1st dose at 12-15 months
2nd dose at 4-6 years
Protects against varicella (chicken pox), a herpes virus that causes fever and skin lesions.
Hepatitis A (HepA) Two doses at least 6 months apart at 12-23 months

Children not vaccinated by age 2 can receive the vaccine at subsequent visits
Protects against hepatitis A, a virus that causes liver disease.
Meningococcal (MCV4)* MCV4 is given to children aged 2 through 10 years with persistent comple¬ment component deficiency, anatomic or functional asplenia and certain other conditions placing them at high risk Protects against a bacteria that can cause meningitis, an inflammation of the membranes that cover the brain and spinal cord.
Children age 7-18 years
Tetanus, diphtheria, pertussis (Tdap) 1st dose at 11-12 years

Catch-up immunization at 13-18 years
Protects against tetanus, a disease that affects the body’s muscles and nerves; diphtheria, a serious bacterial infection that usually affects the mucous membranes of the nose and throat; and pertussis (whooping cough), a highly contagious bacterial infection that causes uncontrollable, violent coughing.
Human papillomavirus (HPV) 1st dose for females at age 11-12 (minimum age for first dose is 9 years)
2nd dose 1-2 months after first dose

3rd dose 6 months after the first dose, at least 24 weeks after the first dose

Series should be given to females at age 13 who haven't been previously vaccinated
Protects against human papillomavirus (HPV), a sexually transmitted infection that can lead to cervical cancer.
Meningococcal* 1 dose given at 7-10 years in high risk groups

1 dose given at 11-12 years in children not in high risk groups

Catch-up dose given at 13-18 years
Protects against a bacteria that can cause meningitis, an inflammation of the membranes that cover the brain and spinal cord.
Influenza Given at 7-18 years in high-risk groups Protects against pneumococcal bacteria, which can cause pneumonia, bacteremia and meningitis.
Hepatitis A (HepA)* Series given at 7-18 years in high-risk groups Protects against hepatitis A, a virus that causes liver disease.
Hepatitis B (HepB) Catch-up series given at 7-18 years Protects against the hepatitis B virus, a serious disease that affects the liver.
Inactivated poliovirus Catch-up series given at 7-18 years Protects against the virus that causes polio, a highly infectious disease that invades the nervous system and can quickly lead to paralysis.
Measles, mumps, rubella Catch-up series given at 7-18 years Protects against measles, a highly contagious virus that causes respiratory symptoms and a rash, mumps, a virus that causes swollen glands, and rubella (German measles), a virus that primarily affects the skin and lymph nodes.
Varicella (chicken pox) Catch-up series given at 7-18 years Protects against varicella (chicken pox), a herpes virus that causes fever and skin lesions.

* Only given to children in certain high-risk groups

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